Ma (2019) | Movie Review |

The Obsessive Mother-Like Figure trope in horror films has finally received a version of the character that is seasoned in Blumhouse’s 2019 psychological-thriller Ma. Directed by Tate Taylor and starring veteran actress Octavia Spencer, Ma follows a group of teenagers who befriend a lonely middle-aged woman who allows them to party in her basement, only for startling and crazy things to happen. Ma came about because Octavia Spencer was tired of not being offered a lead role and director Tate Taylor, who worked with Spencer on The Help, said he wanted to create something that was “f****d up and MAAAAN, did they DELIVER!

Kids, drugs are bad, MMMKAY!

This movie will relate to people who grew up in a small town the most. Maggie Thompson (Diana Silvers) and her mother Erica Thompson (Juliette Lewis) have moved to Erica’s hometown in Ohio after Maggie’s father cheated on her mother. Being the new girl at her high school, Maggie befriends a group of friends that just like to party and get drunk. If you’ve ever been to a gas station then you’ve more than likely experienced some random underage teen asking if you will buy cigarettes or alcohol for them. Maggie and her friends are that kid.

McKaley Miller, Corey Fogelmanis, and Diana Silvers in Ma (2019)
IMDB/Ma

The problem is they asked the wrong person. Kids, this is why you shouldn’t talk to strangers. They ask what turns out to be a lonely sociopathic middle-aged veterinary technician named Sue Ann (Octavia Spencer). At first glance Sue Ann seems normal but she is far from that. She became obsessed with Maggie and her group of friends right off the bat. She invites them to come to her house and drink in her basement. One of the teens gave her the nickname Ma and her place became the go-to spot for the kids to drink, party and cut loose. The only rule that Ma has is for the kids to keep the party in the basement and not venture upstairs, y’know, respect her house.

Octavia Spencer, Dante Brown, McKaley Miller, and Gianni Paolo in Ma (2019)
IMDB/Ma

Of course in this type of movie someone has to go not follow the rules and go upstairs. Maggie and Haley (McKaley Miller) have to be the ones that go and investigate but when they hear strange noises coming from another they get creeped out and don’t want to go back to Ma’s. Haley even goes far enough to tell the rest of her classmates not to go back there and they put the kibosh on future party attempts.

Diana Silvers in Ma (2019)

Yet, for some reason, the script calls for the kids to go back to Ma’s for the most absurd reasons, even after finding out that Ma was stealing from them and noticing that she was off her rocker. The great thing about this movie is that the script is B-level but the direction and acting elevates past the things that are holding it back. To the film’s defense there is a reason why these kids would make such a foolish decision.

During the film’s third act, when the horror aspect picks up, Diane Silvers shines as the Final Girl trope. Even Ma comments on her doey eyes which are perfect for expressing the fear that is racing through her mind as she’s tied up to a dog collar watching her friends being tormented.

Diana Silvers in Ma (2019)
IMDB/Ma

Another thing about this movie that made it enjoyable was that the parents of these teenagers cared about their child. Erica is a passive-aggressive mother for the first two acts of the film and it’s completely understandable because she and her daughter have just moved and they’re going through some things. Once Erica finds out about Ma, giving her daughter drinks and a place to party, she does some parenting and tells Maggie to stay away from Ma and confronts Ma to stay away from her daughter. Maggie being the rebellious teen that she ends up going back to Ma’s house anyway but once  Erica finds out she curses up a storm. This small scene establishes a lot because there are too manyfilms in the horror genre that make the parents complete idiots.

Juliette Lewis and Diana Silvers in Ma (2019)
IMDB/Ma

Don’t Let Me Drink Alone

What makes Ma stand out in comparison to the unseasoned version of the psychotic mother-like stalker thriller is Octavia Spencer’s acting and the film is not taking itself too seriously. When one of the teens gets too mouthy with Ma she pulls a gun out on them and things become tense for the character and those watching the film, yet Ma laughs this off and quips with “Do you think I’m Madea or something,” which releases the tension. Sue Ann keeps that thaaang on her.

Octavia Spencer in Ma (2019)
IMDB/Ma

Ma is definitely campy and there are moments that don’t make sense or are just presented too conveniently for the plot, especially when the film delivers Sue Ann’s backstory. Sue Ann never left the town the film was set in and when she was in high school the students played a cruel prank – and this prank was VERY MESSED UP – on her. Turns out the main group of teenagers that we’ve seen throughout the film are the children of the kids that picked on Sue Ann in high school. Before this is revealed in the film you can tell that things are headed this way.

Even knowing that twist was coming, it didn’t hurt the film because of the strength of Spencer’s performance. She’s everything you would want in a horror villain, creepy, mysterious, quick-witted and terrifying. She killed one character with her car and it got a laugh out of me. By knowing when to and when not to take itself seriously, Ma is a film that audiences who see movies with a group of friends would love.

IMDB/Ma

Spencer said she took the role because she was tired of not being offered lead roles in films and if the movie doesn’t offer her those opportunities then nothing will. This was her LeBron James moment and the script was the Cavaliers in the NBA Finals and although horror’s rarely get Oscar nominations, I hope she gets one for this.

Having a smaller budget worked in this film’s favor too. Instead of going out of the way and trying to create something scary, the minimalist approach with the mask pictured below did the job fine, and other studios should take notes.

 

 

Ma (2019)
IMDB/Ma

Final Thoughts

One thing that should be stated about Ma and the people behind the scenes, is that 2019 has been such a marvelous year for black women in horror and Blumhouse has produced two wonderful films with strong black leads. When Octavia Spencer was pitched this role, she asked if she was going to die first and it turns out she was the last death in the film. Progress.

This film isn’t a perfect film and with a stronger script or a couple of revisions then it would get a higher rating but I was never bored and the pacing always kept me interested in what was going to happen next. In a messed up way, it was refreshing to finally see the shoe on the other foot when it comes to a stalker terrorizing their victims.

The undertones of seeing a black lady who was picked on by her peers in a predominately white town enact some type of revenge is something you do not see every day on the big screen. The film addresses race in a comedic way by having Ma paint the only other black person in the film, white:

IMDB/Ma

If you’re looking for something fresh and original then give Ma a chance while it is still playing in theaters. Remember, don’t talk to strangers and don’t let her drink alone.

Fin.

RATING

[Fresh Horchata]

[Fuego]

[Bueno]

[así así]

[Basura]

[All Mames Wey]

Ma was released in theaters on May 31, 2019

Like. Share. Discuss: @PeliculasCosas

Us (2019)|Movie Review|

Following up on the 2016 hit, Get Out, director and writer Jordan Peele does not suffer from a sophomore slump with his latest horrifying, psychological thriller, Us. Peele’s Monkeypaw Productions and Blumhouse have teamed up with Universal Pictures to deliver another entry into the doppelgänger subgenre of horror. Us stars Lupita Nyong’o, Winston Duke, Shahadi Wright Joseph, and Evan Alex as an African-American family who has been confronted by a group of doppelgängers known as the Tethers.

Technically, It Doesn’t Peele Anything Back

After Get Out and Us, it’s safe to say that director and writer Jordan Peele is the new face of horror for the 2010s and beyond. Peele has a knack for building suspense in his films and does a perfect job of framing each scene in unique ways. He uses small details for foreshadowing and in turn it adds to the film’s narrative. There’s a scene early on where the Wilson family is walking on the beach and Peele uses a bird’s-eye shot to focus on the family’s shadows as they walk by. This is a sly way of introducing the idea of the doppelgänger that is shadowing the family. When the big reveal happens later on in the film, the image below may possibly have a different meaning.screenshot_20190325-210336_youtube.jpgPeele knows how to effortlessly blend horror with comedy to balance out the suspense and the thrill. The scene where the Tethers are introduced is a good example of how he fuses comic relief while something terrifying is happening, while not allowing it to distract from the tone of the film.  In the clip below, Gabe Wilson (Winston Duke) confronts the family of Tethers, who is outside of his family’s beach house, and Peele’s writing shows that this is a suspenseful moment, yet there is plenty of humor in Wilson’s dialogue that fits the composition of the scene.

While there is a lot to praise about the film’s writing, there are some storytelling elements that the film could’ve done a better job with. The opening 5 minutes before the opening credits should have been woven throughout the film’s narrative or left on the cutting room floor. The issue with this part of the movie is that it takes the surprise from the big reveal that happens during the third act. As a screenwriter, since Peele kept that part of the film, then the narrative of the film should’ve changed since the audience already knows the motivation of Red/Adelaide Wilson (Lupita Nyong’o). If he changes the film’s narrative then he doesn’t have to cram an explanation as to why Red is doing what she’s doing and the film won’t have as many loose ends at the end of the film.

Speaking of the confrontation between Red and Adelaide, Michael Abels returns with a perfect score. Abels provided the score for Jordan Peele’s critically acclaimed directorial debut, Get Out, and he brought his A-game to Us. The composition of the sounds that  he uses creates a suspenseful environment that sonically adds an additional layer of depth to the film. During the big climax the film uses the version of “I Got 5 On It” that was in the trailer and it works perfectly. Luniz would be proud.

Adelaide From A Wonderland

Performance wise, the cast of Us deliver performances that will be etched in history when it comes to actors acting in dual roles. The Tethers are sinister versions of the main characters and everyone, from the adults to the kids, knows how to convey the proper emotion from their characters without it looking cringeworthy. Lupita’s performances as Adelaide and Red will be talked about for years and should see her get an Oscar nomination. In an interview with Variety, Lupita stated that Peele shot her scenes as Red and Adelaide on different days, and that she would stay in character when the cameras were off. This type of commitment to her character manifests itself throughout the scenes when both characters are paired in the same scene. Lupita also has an expressive face, so she does not have to say a single word because her expressions do the talking for her.20190326_121506.jpg20190326_121715.jpgLupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke weren’t the only members of the Wilson family that brought out the best in their characters, it was a family affair because their spawns children were just as formidable. Zora Wilson/Umbrae (Shahadi Wright Joseph) and Jason Wilson/Pluto (Evan Alex) are half the size and twice as gruesome as their parents. Pluto and Umbrae are relentless, there are points in the film where Umbrae attacks people that aren’t even related to her human counterpart. Meanwhile, Pluto is a demon child who wants to watch the world burn through Hell, fire and brimstone. Evan Alex’s performance is what sells the events at the end of the film because he has to portray complete fear as Jason and that can be hard to do for such a young actor.

Down The Rabbit Hole (Spoilers Below) 

Us would not be a horror from the mind of Jordan Peele if it wasn’t filled with any sort of symbolism or easter eggs that convey a deeper meaning. Back in 2018, Peele tweeted out a rorschach poster that explains the film’s duality. In the film, Jeremiah 11:11–“Therefore this is what the Lord says: ‘I will bring on them a disaster they cannot escape. Although they cry out to me, I will not listen to them.'” — which is similar to an expression by another Rorschach.

The duality of the number 11 is more than likely why that verse was chosen in the film.  One creature that is shown throughout the film are rabbits. There are rabbits before the opening credits, there are stuffed rabbits, rabbits in the underground tunnel. The fact that there is a tunnel underground where the Tethers live is what makes the rabbit hole theme so prevalent. Scissors are the weapon of choice and Peele has stated that scissors represent the idea of being bound together (the Tether and the human) yet a scissors function is to tear things apart (the Tethers kill the humans). Also, scissors look like rabbit ears, which adds another element to them being chosen as the weapon in the film.

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screenshot_20190325-205743_youtube.jpgZora, a track runner, is pictured with a rabbit on her shirt as she spends the first act of the film outrunning her tether. If this was folklore then the hare would defeat the tortoise in this race. The image above also shows Adelaide Wilson in a white shirt. Everyone knows that the color white is used to represent purity yet by the time the film finishes that shirt is stained crimson from all of the blood.  By the end of the film, Adelaide is Red, both figuratively and literally. The big revelation at the end of the film is that the Adelaide that we’ve been watching this whole time is really a tether and the tethered is actually the real Adelaide. Adelaide is the only character who has a tethered that is named after a color, and Peele does an inconspicuous job at showing the transition within the film’s larger story.20190326_121751.jpgJason is the character in the film that was used for the most nods and easter eggs to other horror movies. He is a character that is always pictured in a mask as if he was a certain slasher that comes out to play every Friday the 13th. During the film, Jason is also the only human that is able to make his tether mimic his actions. The film never really explains why, nor why it only works some of the time. The only thing that I can think of is because he and his tether are both a human-tether hybrid, which means they share half of a soul since Red stated that the tether were like humans but without the soul. This may also be the reason why at the beach (picture #1) the shadows of Jason and Zora (tether-human hybrids) are pictured at the same peak as Adelaide (full tether) yet their father’s (full human) is substantially larger.20190326_121558.jpgJason is also wearing a Jaws shirt which is a nod to the Steven Spielberg classic. Jaws exploit the fear of the deep blue sea whereas Us shows the fear of ourselves. Like the shark that attacked in Jaws, the Tethered in Us also came out from beyond the deep, except these horrifying creatures crawled up from unused tunnels.20190326_192403.jpg

Final Thoughts

Although not a perfect movie and not as great as Jordan Peele’s previous film, Us, overall, is a stellar outing for the sophomore director. The acting was flawless all around and Lupita Nyong’o has the best performance of any actor so far in 2019. Winston Duke shines in every scene that he’s in, Evan Alex and Shahadi Wright Joseph were some of the best child actors in a horror movie since the cast of 2017’s It. Peele’s work behind the camera is just as good as ever and he knows how to capture the suspenseful moments. The writing could’ve been better and more consistent. One second the tethers seemed to have some sense of enhanced speed or strength and other times they seemed like normal humans. Overall, 2019 has been a rough year in film so far, but Peele delivered a proper follow-up to his 2017 hit. If you haven’t seen this one on the big screen then check it out when you get a chance.

Fin.

RATING

[Fresh Horchata]

[Fuego]

[Bueno]

[así así]

[Basura]

[All Mames Wey]

Us was released in theaters on March 22, 2019.

Happy Death Day 2U (2019) |Movie Review|

February 14th is a day known for love, romance and a giant baby piercing people in their hearts. Cupid isn’t shooting arrows, but instead this Valentine’s Day, Blumhouse and Universal have teamed up to produce Happy Death Day 2U, a sequel to the 2017 commercially successful dark comedy-horror, Happy Death Day. Christopher Landon returns as the director and sole writer with characters created by Scott Lobdell, and the film sees the return of actors Jessica Rothe, Israel Broussard, Ruby Modine, Rachel Matthews, and Phi Vu.

When I first saw the trailer for this film, I was somewhat worried because the first one ended in a way that a sequel would seem hard to execute. Luckily, Christopher London had a vision that worked out as a soft-reboot and genre change for the franchise. For those that have not seen the first Happy Death Day, it’s a fun PG-13 horror-comedy that I would recommend checking out before seeing this sequel.

After the events of the first film, Tree Geldman (Jessica Rothe) finds herself stuck in the time loop on her birthday. One of the biggest questions after the first film was why Tree was in a time loop in the first place. Happy Death Day 2U does a decent job trying to explain it but I think it could’ve done a better job at incorporating events from the first film in its explanation. Outside of that, there are tons of callbacks from the first film. Some work and some were not as impressive, and there are some scenes that may have been cut, lifted and pasted from the first movie as well. Similar to the first film, the sequel starts off as a slasher and then after the first death, it gets far away from it.

The acting in the film and its characters are its biggest strengths. Jessica Rothe is criminally underrated and her performance as Tree Geldman is just as good as it was in the first film. In a film that is completely unrealistic Tree brings a sense of realism that a normal person would have if they were stuck in a time loop that they once broke. Her relationship with Carter (Israel Broussard) has a nice wrinkle to it, which gives the film a sense of freshness. Carter is still a character who works as the film’s moral compass when Tree reverts to her old ways. Even the returning side characters played bigger roles in the overall story of the film. Danielle (Rachelle Matthews) was impressionable in the first film and in this one she adds another layer to her relationship with Tree. If there’s a third film then I am looking forward to seeing where her character goes. Lori (Ruby Modine) plays a different role than the previous film, which also creates a more rounded character. New characters like Dre (Sarah Yarkin) and Samar (Suraj Sharma) were a welcome addition but they could’ve been used more effectively. They’re both comedy characters and when they’re paired with Danielle there’s a hijink scene that could’ve been left on the cutting room floor.

Another under utilized character is Ryan (Phi Vu), based on the trailer, it seems like he would’ve had a bigger role in the film. Before Tree’s first death, the film focuses on Ryan and it makes the movie feel fresh and not derivative of the first Happy Death Day. As Ryan gets pushed into the background, the more messy the film becomes. There’s a complete genre shift as the movie progresses which is what I loved about this film, yet at the same time, when it harps back to the first film it’s very hit or miss. Scott Lobdell, creator of the characters in the first film, helped write the first movie and the sequel is missing his touch. Christopher Landon did a fine job at making this movie mean something. The emotional scenes with Tree are phenomenal and they hit a nerve for a sequel to a horror-comedy. Jessica Rothe really deserves an Oscar nomination and that’s how great she’s been in these films.  Where Happy Death Day 2U flounders is when it completely ditches the horror-mystery elements and goes full sci-fi, romance and comedy because of the jerk in the tonal shift.

The technical aspects are not on par with the first film when it comes to editing. The first film was edited by Gregory Plotkin and this one was edited by Ben Baudhuin. Baudhuin’s attention to detail was a major step down when it came to the reaction shots and it was noticeable throughout the film. Even with these flaws, this was a serviceable sequel to the first film. I admire how they took chances that a lot of sequels wouldn’t think of taking. Some of those chances paid off and others did not, but with the characters created within this universe and now multi-verse I think going forward Happy Death Day will be the cornerstone franchise for Blumhouse. A third film has not been greenlit as of writing this review, but Tree and her friends deserve one more outing on the big screen. Jessica Rothe keeps churning out performances like this, then it won’t be long before the world takes notice. After the events of this film (mid-credit scene) I would not be surprised if Danielle (Rachel Matthews) gets a spin-off Netflix (re: streaming service) series. Happy Death Day 2U is an ambitious sequel that does some things right, a few things wrong, but overall, it made a time loop worth seeing again.

Fin.

RATING

[Fresh Horchata]

[Fuego]

[Bueno]

[así así]

[Basura]

[All Mames Wey]

Happy Death Day 2U is in theaters February 13, 2019.

Glass (2019) |Movie Review|

**Spoiler Free Review**

The Eastrail 177 trilogy has finally reached its last stop with Glass, M. Night Shyamalan’s newest film. Glass serves as the sequel to the highly successful, critically acclaimed psychological horror-thriller Split, and the superhero-thriller Unbreakable. It’s been 19 years since the theatrical release of Unbreakable, yet M. Night was able to have familiar faces reprise their roles, which is huge for those continuity sticklers. Returns from the 2000 film include Elijah Price/Mr. Glass (Samuel L. Jackson), David Dunn (David Dunn/The Overseer), Joseph Dunn (Spencer Treat Clark) and Elijah’s mother Mrs. Price (Charlayne Woodard). They’re joined by Split characters Kevin Wendell Crumb/The Horde (James McAvoy) and Casey Cooke (Anya Taylor-Joy) with the introduction of a new character Dr. Ellie Staple (Sarah Paulson).

I had my own personal Shyamalanathon before watching Glass as a refresher. If you haven’t seen the previous two films in this trilogy then see them beforehand. There’s a few things about Shyamalan’s style that caught my eye in Glass. As a filmmaker, Shyamalan’s techniques at creating thrilling moments are on full display in this film. He still has those same Hitchcockian elements to his style when it comes to panning the camera and creating the right shot for the perfect reaction. He’s Hitchcock behind the camera and in front of it when it comes to making his cameos. As a writer some of his dialogue is riveting, especially delivered by the actors in this cast. The first half of the film is where the dialogue and the storytelling are at their best. Samuel L. Jackson puts a masterclass on how facial expressions can convey an impactful message without uttering a single word. James McAvoy’s performances with multiple personalities is just as good as it was in Split. He brings humor yet when he transforms into The Horde, he’s just as menacing.

Bruce Willis didn’t really bring anything to the film for me. During the opening action sequence at the beginning of the film he wasn’t intense and he was nowhere near the level of James McAvoy. For most of the film I wasn’t 100% convinced that Bruce Willis wanted to be there. Anya Taylor-Joy picks up where she left off in Split with another compelling performance by the scream queen. Sarah Paulson had a good performance, but for some reason when M. Night wrote the dialogue for Dr. Ellie Staples he just decided for it to be bland. She might as well be a narrator because she’s just explaining what we are seeing instead of the film showing us. It gets to a point in the film where it makes you question if Shyamalan wrote this film back in 2000 and just didn’t decide to update it for 2019 before filming it. The scenes after the climax and the very last scene of the film further exacerbates this point.

Quick rant about the biggest issue with The Overseer (what a name). The human body is made up of around 60% water and the Earth is made up of 71% of water, so having water being David Dunn’s kryptonite has always seemed kind of goofy. For Mr. Glass it makes sense that he would have “brittle bone syndrome” because he’s a genius. Being a Lex Luthor type character and having a weak body seems like an even trade-off. Kevin Crumble has 24 different personalities that are always battling for the light so for flashes of light triggering a reaction also makes sense. Unbreakable explains that Dunn nearly drowned as a child so he’s not as strong once he’s submerged in water. 19 years later, it’s still a strange weakness to have on planet Earth.

This film is the weakest in the trilogy. There’s a lot of flaws in logic that are apparent throughout the movie. Most of the cast gives quality performances throughout the film. Shyamalan’s direction is up there with some of the best films in his filmography. The writing is where, for lack of better words, the glass shatters. It’s a shame because I really enjoyed Split and I thought Unbreakable was pretty good. In many ways Glass’s biggest twist is that the films (and their titles!) that make up the Eastrail 177 trilogy serves as a metaphor for director M. Night Shyamalan’s career. Unbreakable, a reference to a time when M. Night was at his peak; when Split was released he was going through a rough patch and audiences were divisive on whether or not he still had it; and to top it all off, Glass is a film that, depending on your view, either feels half-empty or half-full once it reaches its conclusion.

Fin.

RATING

[Fresh Horchata]

[Fuego]

[Bueno]

[así así]

[Basura]

[All Mames Wey]

Glass is in theaters January 18th, 2019.

Happy Death Day 2U (2019) |Trailer Thoughts|

February 14th is a day for love, romance and a giant baby piercing people in their hearts. Cupid isn’t shooting arrows, but instead on Valentine’s Day, Blumhouse and Universal are releasing the sequel to the 2017 time loop-slasher film Happy Death Day. After premiering the trailer earlier this year during Halloween (2018) we are finally treated to its official worldwide release below.

Just like the time loop the characters live in, the sequel brings back the director Christopher B. Landon, and the main characters Theresa “Tree” Gelbman (Jessica Rothe) and Carter Davis (Israel Broussard). The first Happy Death Day was a critical success and made over 120 million dollars on a 4 million dollar budget. Personally, it was one of my favorite movies of 2017 because it was entertaining, funny and a fresh take on the slasher film genre.

The trailer for the sequel looks promising. The idea that Tree’s killer from the first one dies in a time loop and it’s affecting her friends, so they have to team up to stop her/him adds an interesting detail to the plot. If the first film’s genre blend is described as “Groundhogs Day meets Scream,” then this sequel is akin to Avengers: Infinity War meets Source Code on Friday the 13th. Hopefully it’ll overcome the usual problems that sequels run into, but I think with such a fresh idea. It’ll end up being a ….. excuse the pun Happy Death Day!

Fin.

Happy Death Day 2U is in theaters February 14th, 2019.

Halloween (2018) |Movie Review|

40 years later, we finally have a Halloween film that carries the spirit of the original .  At the helm is the leader in 21st century horror films, Blumhouse Productions, which has teamed up with Miramax to produce a slasher film that pays homage, yet has enough modern flair to keep things fresh. Familiar names like the executive producer and creator John Carpenter, and the ‘Original Scream Queen’  Jamie Lee Curtis make their long-awaited return to the franchise. The director and co-writer David Gordon Green teams up once again with a frequent collaborator and co-writer Danny McBride (Pineapple Express, Your Highness, Eastbound & Down) to bring freshness to a franchise that’s old enough to retire from the military. Curtis returns to her role as Laurie Strode to finally put an end to Michael Myers on this All Hallows’ Eve. Halloween is a direct sequel to the 1978 film of the same name, and on top of that this version ignores the multiple sequels that have taken place within the last 40 years.

Being that this is a direct sequel to the first film, the movie is self-aware and does a full dismissal of the other 9 (NINE NUEVE!!!!) films. One of the characters mentions how Laurie and Michael are siblings and another character says that’s something people made up. John Carpenter has been vocal in the past about how his biggest regret was making the two siblings, retconning that, gave the franchise a new spin. The greatest strength of the film is its self-awareness, which gives it a good balance of humor paired with its chilling horror.  There’s a scene with a child named Julian (Jibrail Nantambu) who says everything the audience is thinking about and it’s hilarious. Give that kid all the Oscars! John Carpenter created a score that worked perfectly throughout the film. The iconic theme is back, and the sinister sound of the keys adds a true haunting element. As a slasher flick, it does not overly rely on jump scares, and the filmmakers did a brilliant job with the framing of scenes. There are scenes of Michael standing in the background that bring more fear than a random jump scare could ever do. Death counts aren’t excessively high, but they are violent and gruesome. Even the deaths that take place off-screen are gruesome when we see the carnage bestowed upon Michael’s victims.  Let’s just say the movie earns its R rating (keep the kids at home).

With Michael being committed to a mental hospital for 40 years,  Laurie has been living with PTSD since the events of the first film and it has turned her into a full-blown psycho. She’s estranged from her family and paranoid, yet waiting for the day Michael gets out. Curtis’s performance is exceptional, and she brings a lot of depth to Laurie even when the dialogue isn’t there for her. Her facial expressions, body language and the glares she gives makes her a badass grandma. Laurie’s not running away from Michael, she’s done screaming, there is no trick or treat, this time it’s do or die. Laurie’s daughter and granddaughter have lived a mostly normal life, which adds conflict with their relationship with the matriarch of the Strode family. The Dr. Loomis-esque character of the film does an analysis on how Michael versus Laurie is predator versus prey, but since they both have had four decades to prepare for this night maybe the roles have reversed.

Overall, this movie is gory, meta, vengeful and an important movie for the horror genre. There’s a post-credit scene that you should wait after the credits. The original 1978 Halloween is a landmark in American cinema, birthed a decade full of slasher films with iconic characters and, hopefully, its retcon sequel, even as a quadragenarian, will be just as influential.

Fin.

RATING

[Fresh Horchata]

[Fuego]

[Bueno]

[a si a si]

[Basura]

[All Mames Wey]

 

Halloween is in theaters in the United States of America on October 19, 2018.